Eight Great Mezuzah Cases

The first mitzvah performed in a newly established Jewish home is to hang a mezuzah. “Mezuzah” actually refers to the parchment contained in the decorative case, not the case itself, which is just called a mezuzah case. Of course, everyone just calls the whole thing a mezuzah. On the mezuzah scroll is written the Shema Yisrael. It should be rolled, not folded into the case. When purchasing a mezuzah case, be sure to get the correct mezuzah scroll size. Here is a handy infographic, All About the Mezuzah if you want to learn  more.

Mezuzah cases are some of the most accessible forms of Judaica. Compared to menorahs or candlesticks they can be very affordable and they make a terrific gift. There is a dizzying array of mezuzah cases available in just about every style imaginable. Here are some of my favorites out there today.

 

Eight Great Mezuzah Cases

8 Great Mezuzah Cases | Chai & Home

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1 | Brushed aluminum mezuzah by Adi Sidler. I love the minimalist treatment of Shin in this mezuzah, which comes in a variety of colors too.

2 | White and orange metal mezuzah by CeMMent. Like the one above, the shin comes in a variety of colors.

3 | Palm mezuzah by Michael Aram. I love the entire palm series from Michael Aram and this mezuzah is no exception.

4 | Dark wood seven species mezuzah This mezuzah has a little bit of everything…7 species, a shin, and a menorah! All that for $24.70 makes this one a Bubbe’s Bargain.

5 | Sterling silver mezuzah. So beautiful you won’t want people to touch it!

6 | Wheat stainless steel mezuzah. Dorit Klein makes a variety of motifs in this lucite series, but the wheat sheaf is my favorite. If you love lucite, Apeloig Collection is wonderful too.

7 | Torah scrolls mezuzah. A really unique take on a mezuzah and beautiful on a traditional house.

8 | Sterling Silver Willow mezuzah. So beautifully detailed and MezuzahStore.com has a variety of mezuzot along these lines.

 

Don’t forget that when you buy a mezuzah case, the mezuzah scroll is not usually included.

L’Chaim!

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